Butternut squash ravioli

Butternut Squash Ravioli

Jon and I have been saving our yummy wine from Italy, and decided to splurge and open a bottle for dinner on Valentine’s Day. 🙂Montecucco 2009 Wine from ItalyTo go along with the wine, Jon requested homemade ravioli. I decided to make butternut squash ravioli since this dish is one of the few ways I can convince Jon that he wants to eat butternut squash. I started off by sauteing some diced shallots and onion, adding salt, pepper, and fresh sage.

IMG_3209

After the shallots and onion were soft and flavorful, I added frozen butternut squash. The frozen butternut squash works just as well as baking your own, especially since you don’t have to attempt to cut up the squash! Once the squash is cooked, just mash it up with a spoon, and your filling is ready to go.

IMG_3210

Whenever I make ravioli, I am almost always “lazy” and use wonton wrappers (or eggroll wrappers) for the dough.

IMG_3218

After placing the filling, I sealed the ravioli together with water and then trimmed the edges to make them look extra pretty.

IMG_3211

Assembled Ravioli

My herd of assembled ravioli!

I usually let the ravioli dry a little bit before cooking them to go into the pasta sauce.

IMG_3216
 

The ravioli only need to cook for a few minutes, and then they are ready for the sauce.

While the ravioli dried, I started the sauce by sautéing onion and sage in some olive oil. I had a little bit of filling left over, so that went in the pot as well.



Once the onions were soft and flavorful, I made a roux by cooking a little flour, and then adding some veggie stock, almond milk, and white wine to the pan.

IMG_3215
 

Once the sauce is thickened, the ravioli gets mixed in (gently!) and it is ready to serve. Some freshly grated pepper or nutmeg is a perfect topping.

IMG_3217

Butternut Squash Ravioli

4 shallots, minced

1 small onion, minced
1 onion, finely diced
20 fresh sage leaves, in a chiffonade
16 ounces butternut squash, diced (frozen works well)
1 tsp ground allspice
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
24 ounces vegetable broth
6 ounces white wine
1 Tbsp white wine vinegar
1 package wonton wrappers
4 Tbsp olive oil, divided
2 Tbsp flour
Sea salt and pepper to taste
Heat 2 Tbsp olive oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Once the oil/butter is heated, add the shallots the minced onion and a small amount of sea salt. Sauté the onion until it is very soft and slightly caramelized. 
Add half the sage, along with the allspice, nutmeg, and some freshly ground pepper. Sauté for 1-2 minutes to toast the spices, then add the butternut squash. Add a small amount of veggie broth then cover. Cook until the squash is very soft and then mash the squash with the onion/spice mixture. Taste the squash mixture, and adjust seasoning if needed. 
Remove the squash mixture to a bowl. In the same pan, start the sauce by heating the remaining vegan butter and olive oil over medium heat. Add the diced onion and sauté with a little salt until it is caramelized. Add the flour and sage, and cook for 1-2 minutes, then add the vegetable stock. Cover and bring to a low simmer to thicken the sauce. 
Meanwhile, start forming the ravioli. Place a wonton wrapper on a cutting board or plate, and add about 2 tsp of the squash filling into the center of the wrapper. You may need to use more or less filling depending on the size of your wrappers. Brush water on the edge of the wonton wrapper, then fold in half and pinch to seal the edge together. You can also use a ravioli cutter to help seal the edges and make the ravioli extra pretty.
Continue forming ravioli until you have used either all of the wonton wrappers or all of the filling. If you run out of wrappers before filling, you can add the extra filling to your sauce. 
By now your sauce should be thickened slightly. Add the white wine and vinegar, then cook for another minute. Taste and adjust seasoning if needed. 
Cook the ravioli in well-salted boiling water in batches of 10-12. They will only take 2-3 minutes to cook, and will float to the top of the water when they are done. Gently remove the ravioli from the water and add to the pan with the sauce, stirring gently as you add each batch to keep the ravioli from sticking to each other. Serve in shallow bowls topped with freshly grated pepper and a little vegan “Parmesan” cheese (of course, you can use the real stuff if you prefer!). 
Makes 4 generous servings.

Butternut Squash Ravioli

This ravioli is one of the few ways that Jon actually asks for butternut squash. He will eat it in other formats, but wrap it up in pasta dough and serve in a creamy sauce and he gobbles it up!

20140327-172112.jpg
As with almost all my dishes, I started off by dicing up onions, and sautéing them in olive oil. This dish also uses lots of fresh sage, with about half going into the ravioli filling, and the rest going into the sauce.

20140327-172251.jpg
Once the onions were softened and the sage had released lots of flavor, I added the butternut squash. If you were feeling very ambitious you could dice up a fresh squash, but this is one of those times when using frozen is actually better (and easier)!

20140327-172451.jpg
Once the squash is cooked and flavored with turmeric, a little cayenne, and other great flavorings, it is ready to be made into ravioli.

20140327-172621.jpg
The ravioli are very easy to make, if a bit time consuming. It is a little easier if you make an assembly line with several wonton wrappers laid out at once to be filled and formed.

20140327-172735.jpg
The filling is just about the perfect amount to use one packet of wonton wrappers, resulting in a very-satisfying fleet of ravioli.

20140327-172841.jpg
The sauce was simmering away while I formed all the ravioli, so it was all ready for them as they came out of the cooking water.

20140327-173025.jpg
The ravioli cook in batches in just a few minutes, and float to the top of the water once they are ready.

20140327-173125.jpg
After all the ravioli was cooked and had simmered in the sauce for a minute, it was ready for serving. The ravioli is perfect topped with freshly ground pepper and a little vegan Parmesan cheese. Yum!

20140327-173255.jpg
Butternut Squash Ravioli

1 onion, finely diced
20 sage leaves, in a chiffonade
16 ounces butternut squash, diced (frozen works well)
1 tsp ground turmeric
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp ground allspice
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
24 ounces vegetable broth
6 ounces white wine
2 Tbsp white wine vinegar
1 package wonton wrappers
3 Tbsp vegan butter, divided
2 Tbsp olive oil, divided
2 Tbsp flour
Sea salt and pepper to taste

Heat 1 Tbsp of the vegan butter and 1 Tbsp olive oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Once the oil/butter is heated, add the minced onion and a small amount of sea salt. Sauté the onion until it is very soft and slightly caramelized. 

Add half the sage, along with the turmeric, allspice, nutmeg, and cayenne pepper and some freshly ground pepper. Sauté for 1-2 minutes to toast the spices, then add the butternut squash. Add a small amount of water, then cover. Cook until the squash is very soft and then mash the squash with the onion/spice mixture. Taste the squash mixture, and adjust seasoning if needed. 

Remove the squash mixture to a bowl. In the same pan, start the sauce by heating the remaining vegan butter and olive oil over medium heat. Add the diced onion and sauté with a little salt until it is caramelized. Add the flour and sage, and cook for 1-2 minutes, then add the vegetable stock. Cover and bring to a low simmer to thicken the sauce. 

Meanwhile, start forming the ravioli. Place a wonton wrapper on a cutting board or plate, and add about 2 tsp of the squash filling into the center of the wrapper. You may need to use more or less filling depending on the size of your wrappers. Brush water on the edge of the wonton wrapper, then fold in half and pinch to seal the edge together. Continue forming ravioli until you have used either all of the wonton wrappers or all of the filling. If you run out of wrappers before filling, you can add the extra filling to your sauce.

By now your sauce should be thickened slightly. Add the white wine and vinegar, then cook for another minute. Taste and adjust seasoning if needed. 

Cook the ravioli in well-salted boiling water in batches of 10-12. They will only take 2-3 minutes to cook, and will float to the top of the water when they are done. Gently remove the ravioli from the water and add to the pan with the sauce, stirring gently as you add each batch to keep the ravioli from sticking to each other. Serve in shallow bowls topped with freshly grated pepper and a little vegan “Parmesan” cheese (of course, you can use the real stuff if you prefer!). 

Makes 4-6 servings.
Recipe created by Jennifer

20140327-173526.jpg